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PARASITIC DISEASES IN BIRDS

                                                              PROTOZOA and WORMS  The protozoa is an one-celled organism with an animal-like behavior. They are invisible to the naked eye and one-celled microscopic organisms. Certain protoans, through their intensely rapid reproductive ability, can take over the intestinal tract of their host. From there they go on to other organs and tissues. Some of the protoans feed on blood cells and other produce cysts. Frequently diseases caused by parasites are:
The second kind of parasites are the worms. Worms are a primary and serious matter. It is very important that they are completely eradicated. Worms weaken the bird and also increase susceptibility to other secondary diseases, such as canker (Trichomoniasis) and respiratory infection. Worms are multi-cellular organisms and sometimes so large they can usually be seen with the naked eye. Worms come in many sizes. Adult worms multiply by producing eggs called ova or larvae. To avoid worms especially the contact with wild birds should be avoided. There are three common intestinal worms: 1. ROUNDWORM 2. HAIRWORM 3. TAPEWORM

                                                                 ROUNDWORM and HAIRWORM in BIRDS

                                                              Roundworms and Hairworm live in digestive tract of birds and release eggs, which are passed with the bird's droppings. After several days in the environment, these eggs become infective. If then casuelly ingested by other birds, hatch inside them and grow into the new worm, and so on. Sometimes it is no easy way for the bird breeder to tell whether his birds have these parasites because the worms only rarely passed in the droppings and indeed hairworms are microscopic. Only a microscopic examination shows the result and the eggs can be detected.

                          

Owls Head  in Canaries... read more>
Nestlings are dying The Black Spot is a common disease in canaries, finches, also in other kind of birds. During the last few years this infection has progressed. Can this disease be stopped?   
What is the difference between an intensiv and a non-intensiv canary?  read more>
Owls Head  in Canaries... read more>
Nestlings are dying The Black Spot is a common disease in canaries, finches, also in other kind of birds. During the last few years this infection has progressed. Can this disease be stopped?   
What is the difference between an intensiv and a non-intensiv canary?  read more>

TAPEWORM in BIRDS 

Tapeworms also live in the bird's digestive tract. There head or scolex, which is embedded deeply into the lining of the bird's intestine. Behind this head they have progolottids (mature segments). These are the dangerous egg packets for the next generation tapeworms. New segments are developed behind the head, pushing maturing segments further and further away until eventually ribbons of segments trail behind the head down the intestine, with the most mature ones at the end. When fully mature, these egg packets snap free either singly or several at a time in ribbons before passing down the intestine and out with the droppings. The bird breeder will notice either a segmented white ribbon hanging from the bird's cloaca or, as the segments are motile when passed, he will see small white segments wriggling within the droppings shortly after being passed or air-dried segments stuck to the surrounding perch. For a diagnosis is not necessarily a microscope required, because these segments can be seen with the naked eye. Depending on the worm species can vary the size. Little sizes look alike white pieces of cotton trailing through the dropping and larger sizes look like pieces of rice stuck on the surface of the droppings. Very dangerous is that the eggs inside of the segments are ingested by insects. These eggs hatch into infective larvae in the insects. All insect eating birds are at risk, because they become infected by eating these insects.
 Typical Parasitic Diseases in Birds, caused by Endoparasites
Parasitic diseases are caused by parasites. Their organism lives on an host and benefits by deriving nutrients at the host's expense. The parasite has a parallel life to its host. They feeding off the birds energy, cells or all the food the bird eat, including the vitamins and every other supplement food we administer to our birds. Not only that, the parasites excrete in the bodies system and travel throughout them.The host can be in or on another organism. Parasitic diseases can affect all living organisms, including plants. Although organisms such as bacteria function as parasites, the usage of the term “parasitic disease” is usually more restricted. We divide the parasite in two types: 1. Endoparasite, that lives inside its host. (inter alia protozoa, worms) 2. Ectoparasite, that lives on the outside of its host. (inter alia fleas, bugs, mites). More information about bird mites ...  read>