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The Calcium Block by FANCY BIRD SHOP.COM is a small sized Calcium Block for every kind of bird because of the composition especially for smaller species. More informations about FANCY BIRD SHOP.COM’s Calcium Block... read here...>
The Calcium reserves of a Zeba Finch Scientist reported that zebra finches will deplete the calcium reserve after the 5th egg. The study showed a five-egg clutch has a total calcium requirement of 89 mg, but the total calcium reserve of a female is only 90 mg.
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HEATSTROKE, HEAT STRESS AND

DEHYDRATION IN BIRDS

Birds like to sunbathe and feel well in warmer temperatures and are more agile. Indirect sun is great for a bird and can stimulate breeding and singing. But a non-despicable danger is a direct and permanent exposure in the sun. For example, the bird is kept in a cage in direct sunlight where there is no shade or shelter from the sun. A shady place must always be available. It goes without saying that always fresh and clean water is offered. Also in aviaries or breeding rooms, which are exposed to direct permanent sun exposure, should always be paid attention to an good air circulation. Direct sunbeams through a window or stagnant heat under a roof can be a danger. Another trigger can be when too much supplemental heat, in the form of a heat lamp, is supplied. In other words, any additional natural or unnatural heat delivery can lead to heat stroke, heat stress or dehydration of your bird, because they are fragile creatures and very sensitive not to only to toxins also to energy deprivation and physical injury.

How a Bird regulating their Body Temperature?

Healthy birds on hot days will pant. This is completely normal and understandable because panting is the bird’s natural way of cooling itself. Humans and other mammals produce sweat to cool off. The birds average body temperature is between around 41°C (105,8 °F). During the moult the temperature is even 1°C (33,8°F) higher. Than it is certainly understandable considering it's panting of the bird when it heats up. Birds do not possess sweat glands, but the control of their bodies’ heat and hydration is regulated through their air sacs. Cooling occurs during respiration as moisture is evaporated from the lining of the air sacs. As the birds uses its moisture, or fluid, to cool itself, the loss of fluid can lead quickly to dehydration. Birds are not very active during the hottest parts of the day. They seek food or other necessities in the cooler morning and evening hours and seek refuge from the sun's rays in the shade of trees and other shelter. Shaded areas are important. Most protection they will find close to the ground or in a shade place under the leaves of a tree. Some birds take to the skies on hot days to find relief in the cooler temperatures of higher altitudes. In captivity, these possibilities are not given. They are exposed to the full influence from outside.

How Dehydration in a Bird occurs?

Significant sign of overheating is panting, keeping the feathers tight and holding the wings away from the body. When a bird works to keep itself cool, it begins to pant. This panting increases the air flow through the bird’s air sacs, evaporating the moisture and cooling the bird. The resultant loss of moisture can soon lead to dehydration if the bird does not replenish its fluid stores through drinking water. If there is no water available, the bird can’t replenish its fluid stores, so it can’t cool itself. This leads to the so-called “secondary hyperthermia” and and then to death. How do I notice a Dehydration in a Bird? The effects of dehydration can be seen when the bird is around just 5% dehydrated. This level of dehydration occur within 24 hours of 25 ºC (77 ºF) temperatures. When the bird is 5% dehydrated, it becomes quiet and fluffs up. Fluffing is the bird’s attempt to cool itself by raising its feathers away from its body to increase air circulation. If there is a dehydration of around 10% the bird becomes increasingly quiet and even more fluffed. From a level of 15% dehydration, the blood flow reduce circulating to the vital organs, including the brain. The bird's level of consciousness becomes impaired. There is a risk of death at dehydration levels of 15% and beyond.

What Measures help the Bird in case of Overheating?

When the first sign of overheating has been recognized help with the following measures: - Move the bird to a cooler place in the shadow. - Splash the bird with water, also direct on the feet and legs - Avoid any stress. - If the bird gets a shock with visible impacts when touched, place the   bird directly on the ground, making sure that the head rests on   something so it does not stifle. As a rule, the bird recovers after a   few minutes.

What Measures help the Bird in case of Overheating?

When the first sign of overheating has been recognized help with the following measures: - Move the bird to a cooler place in the shadow. - Splash the bird with water, also direct on the feet and legs - Avoid any stress. - If the bird gets a shock with visible impacts when touched, place the   bird directly on the ground, making sure that the head rests on   something so it does not stifle. As a rule, the bird recovers after a   few minutes.